banner-img

SAKSHAM & NEHARICKA’S EPONYMOUS LABEL IS AN ODE TO INDIAN HERITAGE AND BRITISH SOPHISTICATION

People

The brilliant designer duo on the story behind the label and on what’s next

Saksham & Neharicka is an eponymous label of the Delhi-based designer duo Saksham and Neharicka whose creations are a testament of the celebration of freedom and expression through fashion which is young, bold, and brave at heart. The namesake label has beautifully interpreted the ‘exclusivity of freedom’ by combining Indian heritage with cues from British invasion. Hence, all you’ll find is a regal collection that encompasses authentic evening gowns to workday proper silhouettes and how. Entitled as an Indian soul with a global presence, Saksham & Neharicka has developed a taste for enjoying immense pride in how this rich mix has shaped Fashion for all of us. In conversation with the creative duo, we explore more about the dawn of the brand and how this cultural evolution has shaped them as designers. 

Video credits: Saksham & Neharicka

IFM: So, was Saksham & Neharicka label always a dream or it happened along your fashion journey?

Saksham: The fashion journey, that we are still very much a part of,  was to fulfil our dream of creating a label. Our work experience with various brands gave us the confidence to live this dream. Also, our clothing label is the first step that is a part of a bigger dream and with time, we hope to live them all.

Neharicka: For me, fashion was never my background. However, after Saksham introduced me to fashion there was no turning back. As a textile designer, I believe it broadened my horizon of exploration and creativity. So it happened along the way. I believe in this vision and working with fashion has made me fall in love with everything about it.

Photo credits: Saksham & Neharicka

IFM: After having worked with famous labels like AM-PM and Fab India, what are the two learnings that helped you in the making of your own label? 

Saksham: First, quality over quantity any day.

Neharicka: Second, people buy values and experiences, not just the products. For a label like ours, it is extremely important to maintain extremely high-quality standards. We create heirloom pieces that our clients like to pass on to their generations. So it has to have a quality life. Also, our clients and customers are at the heart of our label. Their faith in us compels us to serve them better in any which way we can. 

Photo credits: Saksham & Neharicka

IFM: A young label like yours need fresh ideas clicking round the clock, what serves as your inspiration while designing new pieces?

Saksham: Inspiration can come from anywhere and everywhere. Primarily I look at life and people on the streets of our country. Sometimes it could be a movie, a place or a book.

IFM: What imagery of a woman do you have in mind while designing different outfits? 

Neharicka: We celebrate all women. Irrespective of their age, shape, size, and colour. The modern millennial woman is who we believe in. Unafraid of the society anymore, she is independent, strong and has broken all barriers exceptionally. If there is anyone that needs to be encouraged and cared for an immensely critiqued life, it is ‘her’. As we speak, a woman of such stature is changing the world and we are with her. A woman who is Indian in her soul like us and global in her choices. 

IFM: What has been the hardest thing about breaking into the Indian fashion industry?

Saksham & Neharicka: It is not hard. Anybody who has the will and a certain sense of aesthetics can cater to the fashion industry. There's space for everybody in the industry. However, had we not been studied in the best design schools and been exposed to the best environments, it would have been a different game.

Photo credits: Saksham & Neharicka

IFM: Your latest collection, Murtaza is inspired by Islamic art. Would you like to tell our readers more about how did this idea pop up and maybe a few occasions to flaunt these pieces?

Saksham: I have always been fascinated by Muslim names. Fortunately, I hear a lot of them every day. Murtaza is the first pattern master we employed when we had started our label. Like all names, these words had to mean something and so I asked him about it. He told me the meaning of it and my thoughts just took flight from there. I started reading more about Islamic names and had always wanted to work a collection around Islamic Art. So we dived in.

The pieces that we have offered in this collection are event-centric and elevated basics. The primary focus was to offer people a fresh collection that they can wear in the festive season of Diwali, Dussehra and other festivals where people want to buy new clothes. So we have a collection of printed Kurta sets, tunics, lehengas and sarees in printed chanderi, cotton silk and cotton lurex. 

A special capsule of sarees hand woven in a blend of the luxurious Pashmina yarns and Silk yarns can be your attire for any event in the season. Well, that is the beauty of the classic saree.

The couture collection that has its focus on the wedding season offers kurta sets, sarees, and lehengas that are hand embroidered and can be adorned on a wedding in the family or a wedding in your tribe of people. A collection of sarees is due in November as a part of our trousseau collection and I cannot talk about it right now but we have a big surprise for the young girls out there, come December.

IFM: Each of your design is handwoven and requires great craftsmanship, what is the longest time you have dedicated to complete an outfit?

Neharicka: Avery special piece. It is a raw silk saree that was handwoven and then hand embroidered. It took us about 1800 man-hours to craft one piece of the design.

Photo credits: Saksham & Neharicka

IFM: From Gujarat to West Bengal, you are sourcing raw materials from various cities. Tell us about your favourite materials and what flexibility do they offer you in designing and making?

Saksham: Our favourite material would not be just one fabric. At the moment for us, it is Matka silk handwoven in Bhagalpur. The texture of this textile, in particular, is incomparable. We use materials from all over the country and each has its own technical aspect. Khadi is a material that we have focussed on for the upcoming season and as we are exploring it more and more, it is growing on us.

IFM: You recently designed a bomber jacket for Raj Kumar Rao. Tell us about the whole experience, how did this come to you and what’s your plan on designing more for celebrities? 

Saksham: It felt incredible. It happened by chance, we wanted to dress him up and connected with Isha Bhansali, her stylist. She ran him through our selection of jackets and he asked for the olive velvet bomber. On designing for celebs, I would be more than happy to do it. They are icons. People want to dress like them but I would want celebs from other fraternities as well to wear our pieces, politicians, cricketers especially. Our country has to look beyond Bollywood, especially where fashion is concerned.

Photo credits: Saksham & Neharicka

IFM: What can we expect to see from Saksham and Neharicka in the future? 

Neharicka: Banarasi brocade, More Dresses for the young, dumb and broke. Expect the unexpected.

Saksham: Better designs.

 

Photo Credits: Saksham & Neharicka

IFM: What’s your message to IFM readers on five tips to dress up this Diwali.

Saksham & Neharicka:

1. Maximalist modern prints in modern traditional silhouettes.

2. Ditch the dupatta. A tunic set works best.
3. Wear Saree.

4. One statement jewelry – it could be a pair of big earrings or one elaborate neckpiece, but definitely include a ring. And wear black shoes!

5. Coordinate with your partner. 

Find out more about their latest AW19 collection on the website and Instagram.



At www.iflauntme.com we take great effort to credit all visual content to the source and the rightful owners. However, we can’t guarantee that we always get it right. If you feel we have erroneously identified your image or would like it removed, please get in touch. Our images come from a variety of sources, including Pinterest, Google Images and, of course, directly from the source.

Comments